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Friday, 10 February 2017

A Fun Memory From My Younger (much younger) Years

When we lived on the farm Dad had two tractors; a nice little grey Ford and a great hulking red thing.  I couldn't begin to tell you what breed the red thing was but it was big, really big.  Dad wanted his girls to learn to drive a tractor, preferably the red one as it had more pull power.  I was resistant.  I didn't like the feeling of all that raw power underneath me while I perched precariously on a bobbing and bouncing missile from Hell.  I couldn't reach any of the pedals when I sat on the iron seat (Dad called it the iron maiden) which meant I would have to drive standing up and rolling from side to side to access the pedals.  No thanks.  I was quite happy doing the grunt work in the barn.
The girl my parents adopted was another story.  She was younger than me but she was much more adventurous and, of course, eager to please.  Dad taught her to drive the tractor.  Mom and I were called outside to view her triumphant return from her driving lesson.  Up the farm lane she came and she was doing very well too, until she caught sight of us that is.  Can we all say "squirrel"?  We waved our encouragement and she, grinning from ear to ear, waved back.  She passed the house and headed toward the opening into the barn yard.  Our waving got a little more excited (read agitated).  She was still looking at us and waving.  The tractor was a little off course, headed straight for the gasoline tank that sat just inside the opening to the barn yard.  Dad was running behind, sweating and yelling and waving his arms.  We were gesticulating wildly from the front porch and she was driving along basking in the glory of all her followers.  By the grace of God she decided to take a look at where she was going and veered sharply out of harm’s way in the "nick of time".  I don't believe she did any more tractor driving after that.  Dad didn't mention any more lessons for either of us.  I think he got the message.

18 comments:

  1. You made that memory come alive. I was a bit of a daredevil as a kid, but I still don't think I would have wanted to drive a monster tractor. (Now? I think it would be a blast to drive a huge construction vehicle, like an earth-mover or crane...)

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    1. I have a not so secret dream of a monster truck lol.

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  2. I think I would have liked growing up on a farm...except for that getting up at sunrise and working in the fields part.

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    1. Not to mention the getting up in the middle of the night because you have a sow farrowing.

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  3. You write such a vivid account that it seems like I was in the scene too. ""Nick of time"" is very good and needed so many times. Life saver it is !

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    1. tt was one of those experiences that never leave you.

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  4. This could have ended so much worse. It hardly bears thinking about. Well told, by the way!

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    1. It's true. It could have been bad.....very bad.

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  5. As Jenny said, it could have ended up far worse.
    Good to read the story about early years ...
    Memories, the older we get the more we cherish them.

    Wishing you a good weekend to come

    All the best Jan

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    1. One of those memories you file in the 'let's not do that again' file.

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  6. While I was laughing at the way it was written, as an entertaining story, I can only imagine the fear your father must have felt as she was headed for the gasoline tank. Good lord! That was a close call.

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    1. We were all 'sweating bricks' as the saying goes. She, on the other hand, didn't seem to know what all the fuss was about. She didn't hit the tank after all, did she?

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  7. Yikes! Heavy machinery and daredevil teenagers is not a good mix.

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    1. She would have been 12. Just at the easily distracted stage.

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  8. 20 years before I retired from gardening public places, I went down to the corporation yard and found a 1962 Ford 2000 tractor, homely little thing but I fixed it up and used it until I called in old. It could fit through gates and was strong enough to uproot stumps, gentle enough to grade athletic tracks. I could do my paperwork on its flat dash and had its steel seat upholstered. Big tractors have their place, I suppose, and I've used them but have never bonded with them. And yes, big red tractors scare the heck out of me. They're supposed to. Glad you brought it up. Terrific post!

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    1. That little gray Ford was a sweetheart of a tractor...but I STILL didn't drive it. Glad I could bring up some happy tractor memories for you.

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